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What did thrasymachus tell socrates about the meaning of justice?

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Twenty-five hundred years ago Socrates asked a Sophist orator named Thrasymachus the meaning of justice. It's a question we're still asking. In the first book of the Republic, Plato shares a conversation between Socrates and Thrasymachus, a Sophist orator, that touches on the nature of truth, justice, and law.

Discussing Socrates And Thrasymachus Views On Justice ?

By declaring his views on justice, Thrasymachus asserts that those who act just or believe in justice are the ones at loss, as they receive no benefit. Justice according to him is solely for the ruler, who rules the city. Unlike Socrates, Thrasymachus claims that there is no advantage for the weaker to be just.

What Socrates Understood about Justice, Truth, and Power ? In the first book of the Republic, Plato shares a conversation between Socrates and Thrasymachus, a Sophist orator, that touches on the nature of truth, justice, and law. “I proclaim that justice is nothing but the interest of the stronger,” Thrasymachus tells Socrates.

What's the argument of Socrates in addressing Thrasymachus ? According to Nickolas Pappas, Plato's Republic (Routledge, 2013), Socrates' (unconvincing) refutation of the view of the sophist Thrasymachus, that justice is "nothing other than the advantage of the stronger" (338c) runs as follows : The work of the soul is living. (353d) The …

Is Justice Good in Itself?

Now when looking into the response that Socrates gives Thrasymachus in the dialogues of Book I, it is important to realize that Socrates believes justice has no true meaning or definition from a ruling force or political power.

Why did Socrates deny Thrasymachus' definition of justice ? Socrates viewed justice as one of the most many "ideal types" where he believed. In a similar way, today we view justice as an overarching ideal to which government, the courts, and the laws we move have to aspire.

Is Justice Good in Itself? One thing that is certain, Socrates, Thrasymachus and Glaucon did not agree upon the basis of justice being good in itself. From the ideas of political authority determining, to the benefiting result and finally doing the act for the sake of doing the just …

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